fuckindiva:

Sophia Loren at the Festival de Cannes, 1959

(via jjtharvey)

thefashionofaudrey:

The actress Audrey Hepburn photographed with Mr. Famous (her Yorkshire) by Elio Sorci in Rome (Italy), in October 1959.
Audrey was wearing:
Coat: Hermès (of wool, tobacco color, of the collection for the Autumn/Winter 1957/58).
Shoes: Gucci.

thefashionofaudrey:

The actress Audrey Hepburn photographed with Mr. Famous (her Yorkshire) by Elio Sorci in Rome (Italy), in October 1959.

Audrey was wearing:

  • Coat: Hermès (of wool, tobacco color, of the collection for the Autumn/Winter 1957/58).
  • ShoesGucci.

(via lavalevale)

wtfarthistory:

Pillow from the Tomb of Bishop Antonio degli Agli, pre-1477, Museo del Tesoro di Santa Maria dell’Impruneta

babeofbiscay:

Evening wear by Elsa Schiaparelli S/S 1938

(via jjtharvey)

ninjashyme:

Paolo Roversi, Vogue Italia supplement (Mar 2005)

(via jjtharvey)

girlannachronism:

Dolce & Gabbana spring 2011 rtw backstage

(via empirewaistlines)

wtfarthistory:

Piero della Francesca’s mirror haloes in the Sant’Antonio Polyptych in Perugia

(via cuddlinqs)

luzfosca:

Vincenzo Balocchi
Foule vue d’en haut, vers 1938.
From RMN

luzfosca:

Vincenzo Balocchi

Foule vue d’en haut, vers 1938.

From RMN

lapitiedangereuse:

Isabella Rossellini studying her lines for David Lynch’s film Blue VelvetMassachusetts, 1985

(via lavalevale)

cavetocanvas:

Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius - Roman, c. 176 CE

Things to think about when studying:

  • How does the sculptor show the power of Marcus Aurelius / how do you know he is an emperor and not some regular guy?

allthesaintsyoushouldknow:

Realer than Real

Two examples of simulacrum, or saints’ effigies in Rome.

Top: St. Leontia, a bishop’s daughter martyred in Africa by the Vandals in the 5th century. (At San Francisco d’Assisi a Ripa)

Bottom: St. Victoria, martyred for refusing to marry a pagan. Stabbed to death circa 250AD.

These are both made of wax. In both cases there is an urn at their feet containing internal relics. Though in St. Victoria’s case, the relics are also visible in her face (her skull can be seen behind her eyes and her teeth are real) and right hand (where the wax is purposefully cut away).

Sometimes these wax effigies are referred to as simulacrum, a word that originally referred specifically to an image of a god. That’s more or less how the word is used in this context. But what’s interesting is that the meaning of ‘simulacrum’ morphed over time- it later implied that the copy was second-rate and didn’t retain the particularities of the original. More recently, philosophers like Jean Baudrillard and writers like Umberto Eco and Jorge Luis Borges have used the term to discuss the relationship images and copies of images have to reality and truth. 

It’s an interesting word choice- particularly in the case of these early martyrs. The historical truth about their lives can be hopelessly murky. The wax that covers their bones is almost certainly not their true likeness and the bones themselves may have a spurious background. But as we’ve seen before, the spiritual truth of relics is only tangentially related to their historical truth.

(All photos by me.)

(via amoelbarroco)

superseventies:

Marisa Mell photographed by Angelo Frontoni, 1970

(via louisepandora)

atlasobscura:

thefabulousweirdtrotters:

Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas.(Source)

This greenhouse has since been restored,

but a small part of me wishes it still looked this way.

(via amoelbarroco)